Intraductal Mamma Carcinoma right – Diagnostic Chart

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Intraductal Mamma Carcinoma right – Diagnostic Chart

Conflict:

  • Right-handed woman: partner separation conflict. “The partner has been torn from my breast.”
  • Left-handed: separation conflict from the child: “The child has been torn from my breast.”

Idiom:

Hamer Focus:

HH in sensory cortex center cortical left.

Active phase:

In the ca-phase, intraductal ulcers develop, causing a mild painful pulling sensation in the breast, but otherwise usually unnoticed because any “cancer seeker” is only looking for “nodules.” As an accompanying symptom, calcific spatter develops.

Healing:

Mastitis: The normal swelling of the squamous mucosa in the milk duct occurs in the area of the ulcers. Because secretion is formed along with the swelling but cannot drain through the swelling-clogged milk duct, there is a more or less severe swelling behind the nipple (typical finding in intraductal breast cancer). The swelling may be circular or affect only part of the breast.

Crisis:

Absence

Biological Sense:

Active phase

The ulcerous dilation of the milk ducts in the ca-phase has the biological sense that in case of separation of the child or partner, the milk can flow off instead of accumulating in the breast (udder) (cow’s udder “full to bursting”).

Notice:

In the healing phase, so-called mamma-ca: breast cancer. This refers to the ectodermal epithelial ulcer of the skin epidermis. Which is developmentally invaginated by the nipple or immigrated (migrated) along the milk ducts.

CAUTION! Significant complications due to the syndrome. Simple therapy: in goats, it is only necessary to milk out the full udder once or several times a day. There is a lack of suitable human medicine techniques to “milk out” such an inflamed plump breast, as it is no problem in goats.

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